Posted by Peggy Farber on 12/2/2015

Composting is easy to do and helps reduce household waste significantly. If you want to start composting, feel free to begin right at the earth’s level, on the ground. The key to a good compost pile is being sure to layer your items in moderation, allowing air flow and liquids to permeate the entire pile. Be sure to drill some holes in a covered container, allowing air and rain to pass through. If you do not have the space, start small or consider a local community compost option. Start right on the ground with a layer of sticks and grass or hay. As you build from the ground up, add moist layers of household waste and then dry layers of household waste. More carbon than nitrogen is necessary. Carbon examples would be coffee filters, cornstalks, egg shells, peels and wood ash (be sure they are not hot ashes or this whole situation will get out of hand). Nitrogen examples would be manure, lawn clippings, leaves and food scraps. Layering (wet, dry, wet, dry) is key to your compost becoming the rich soil you are striving to create. Layering accordingly will allow for airflow and faster compost. Too many ashes at once will clump and you will be unable to “churn” the composted pile. If you wish to use a bucket or an official com-poster, be sure to layer in the same fashion. Remember to cover this pile; heat retention is important, as well as controlled rain. Too much rain will ruin what you are trying to do. Moist is good, soaked is not good. Now that you are on your way to composting, be sure to turn that pile every few weeks, allowing the oxygen to do its thing. A great way to “churn” your pile is using a pitch fork. Oxygen is important to the breakdown of composted items. If you have an official com-poster, you may see results that much faster. Be patient, this will take some time, but the end result will be well worth it for you, your garden, and your patio plants. Quick note, do not add the following items to your compost pile, this will breed bacteria and attract pests: Any personal products such as toilet paper or tampons, raw rice is a bacterial breeding ground, cooked rice attracts pests, milk products (cream, milk, yogurt) or animal products (bones, blood, fish) should be off limits. Magazine paper or heavily coated paper will just add chemicals to your all natural setting and will not break down any time soon.




Tags: composting   recycle waste   soil  
Categories: Gardening   farming   Yard Improvement