Posted by Peggy Farber on 5/17/2017

A garage sale represents a great opportunity for a home seller. This event enables you to eliminate clutter from your home as well as earn extra cash that you may be able to put toward your future residence. As such, a garage sale should not be taken lightly, and you should do everything you can to prep for this event. So what does it take to host a successful garage sale? Here are three tips that you need to know: 1. Make Your Garage Sale a Family-Friendly Event. It's tough to put together a garage sale on your own. However, you may be able to enlist family members and friends to help you transform an ordinary garage sale into an instant success. Family members and friends can help you organize the items you'd like to sell, offer assistance to shoppers who may be interested in various items and ensure you're able to clean up after your garage sale is complete. Of course, you should offer incentives to encourage family members and friends to help you with your garage sale, too. Whether it's hosting a barbecue in conjunction with your event or offering each helper a share of your garage sale profits, it's important to show your family members and friends that you appreciate their hard work and dedication as they work toward making your garage sale a success. 2. Avoid the Dangers of Overpricing. As a home seller, the goal of your garage sale should be to get rid of any excess items in your house. Thus, you need to avoid the dangers associated with overpricing, because asking too much for numerous items will do little to generate interest among shoppers. Try to be flexible about pricing during your garage sale. Typically, shoppers may ask to negotiate a price on an item, and you should be willing to reconsider your initial price if necessary. A successful negotiation will result in a win-win situation in which both you and the shopper are happy with the results. And with a flexible approach to pricing, you should have no trouble getting rid of a wide range of items at your garage sale and earning substantial profits along the way, too. 3. Don't Forget About the Importance of Customer Service. A customer-oriented approach is paramount throughout your garage sale, and it may enable you to maximize your sales during the event as well. If a shopper has a question, try to respond immediately. Or, if a shopper is ready to check out, provide service with a smile. A friendly, positive attitude can make a world of difference during a garage sale. Therefore, you should remain courteous and approachable during your event and be ready to assist shoppers in any way you can. Hosting a garage sale may seem like a major challenge, particularly for home sellers who lack extensive time and resources. But with the aforementioned tips, you can get organized and make the most of your garage sale.





Posted by Peggy Farber on 10/26/2016

What does it take to generate interest in your home from the right homebuyers at the right time? Marketing is paramount, and using all of the marketing tools at your disposal will make it easier for any home seller to connect with prospective homebuyers consistently. Today, many high-quality marketing tools are readily available to home sellers, including: 1. Social Media Facebook and other social networks now empower home sellers to share details about their residences with homebuyers from around the world. Furthermore, social media is free and easy to use, making it a powerful tool to add to your home selling arsenal. Social media, of course, only ranks as an effective marketing tool if you understand how to leverage it properly. For instance, you'll want to include high-resolution photos of your home with any social media content. You also will want to respond to homebuyers' questions quickly as these queries are posted on social networks, as this may help your home stand out in a crowded real estate market. 2. Virtual Tours Imagine what it would be like if a homebuyer could take a walk through your home even if he or she were many miles away. Thanks to virtual tours, home sellers are able to offer homebuyers a distinct home showing experience, one that is sure to make a long-lasting impression. Before you set up a virtual tour, be sure to consult with a real estate agent. This professional will be able to help you stage your home properly and ensure it looks great to any prospective homebuyer during a virtual home showing. 3. Email Updates Work with your real estate agent to ensure your home is included in any email blasts that he or she sends out. By doing so, you'll be able to maximize your marketing reach and ensure that many homebuyers can learn about your residence immediately. Any email notification should include relevant information for recipients. Therefore, you should ensure that information about your home is included only in email blasts that go to homebuyers who are likely to be interested in your residence. For example, an email blast that is sent to luxury homebuyers should not include information about a tiny house that is now available, as this residence is unlikely to generate significant interest. On the other hand, highlighting your two-bedroom house in an email update sent to first-time homebuyers and small families may be ideal. By doing so, you may improve your home's chances of garnering substantial attention from homebuyers without delay. The home selling process continues to evolve, and thanks to best-in-class technologies, home sellers possess advanced tools they can use to showcase their residences at all times. Discover the benefits of first-rate technologies and be sure to use them as part of your home marketing efforts. With these tools, you'll be better equipped to accentuate the positives of your residence to homebuyers globally and boost your chances of obtaining multiple competitive offers for your house as well.





Posted by Peggy Farber on 7/20/2016

Businesspeople imitating see, hear, speak no evil conceptThe country’s long history of racism and racial discrimination effected many aspects of life in the U.S. and the world of real estate was no exception to this. In the past, real estate agents would practice things such as “steering” and “blockbusting.” In both cases real estate agents played a part in segregating different communities by race.  Whether by steering, suggesting clients look in certain neighborhoods based on their race, or blockbusting, convincing homeowners to sell their homes quickly and at low prices by instilling the fear that minorities would soon be taking over the area, their practices did not have their clients’, or the general populations, best interests at heart. In fact, ‘steering’ and ‘blockbusting’ allowed agents to reap many fiscal rewards of racism. Modern day real estate agents have a very high standard of ethics and laws in place in regard to discrimination for these very reasons. These standards make the content an agent can provide his or her clients with limited at times. There is certain information your agent can not and should not provide. An agent cannot and should not attest to the specifics of a certain neighborhood. The agent shouldn’t tell a client the area is perfect for single persons or on the other hand describe a neighborhood as family-friendly. Your agent can suggest you speak with some of the homeowners in the neighborhood in order to get a better grasp on the neighborhood’s atmosphere. Similarly, If you want to know if the area you’re looking in has a good school system, an agent can point you in the direction of where this information and data is readily available, perhaps online, and allow you to do your own research and make your own assumptions. An agent, generally, cannot provide you with his or her personal experience or opinion on these sensitive topics. This is not detrimental to you as a buyer or a seller. As a seller you are ensured your agent is showing any and all interested buyers, and as a buyer you know your agent is showing you the optimal number of homes and neighborhoods based on your desires not your race. As your real estate agent I’d be happy to point you in the right direction of any information you may be seeking while abiding by all of the highest moral standards of my profession. It is my job to have your best interests in mind.





Posted by Peggy Farber on 5/18/2016

Are you looking to hire a real estate agent to sell your home? Here are some must ask questions of real estate agents before you sign on the dotted line. 1. Do you work full or part-time as a real estate agent? 2. How many homes have you sold in my area and what was the price range? 3. What is your average days on the market until a house goes under agreement? 4. How many sellers are you currently representing? 5. At what price do you think my house will sell in the current market? And why? 6. What is your advertising and marketing plan for my house? 7. Can I see a sample of your marketing? 8. What kind of communication schedule can I expect from you? 9. How long have you been a real estate agent and how much education have you received? Do you have any special designations? 10. Is your real estate license in good standing and have you ever been subject to a client complaint? 11. Why should I hire you over your competition? 12. Do you have a website? What kind of online presence do you have? Lastly, don't forget to ask for testimonials or references.





Posted by Peggy Farber on 3/23/2016

In the hustle and bustle of prepping a home to be sold, many people overlook one very important detail; home safety. And while you'd like to think that prospective buyers visiting your home are upstanding citizens, the simple truth remains that selling your home opens your door wide open to complete strangers...Strangers who are going to be encouraged as potential buyers to explore every detail of your home. Luckily, by taking a few small steps, you can rest a little easier. 1. Hide you valuables - This may seem like a no-brainer, but you'd be surprised how many people forget to put away common valuables like jewelery, high-value collectables, expensive perfumes, and high-end designer accessories like handbags and money clips. Be sure to go from room to room, keeping an eye out for anything that may hold appeal for a potential thief, and tuck away anything you think might draw a thief's attention. Do a follow-up walk of your house the next day, just in case you may have missed something. 2. Firearms - If you are a homeowner who is also a gun and/or weapon owner, then you are probably already taking the necessary precautions in regard to gun safety. However, for some collectors, prominent display is one of the things that a gun owner may take pride in. Just because your guns are in a locked, secured display case doesn't mean that they still don't hold risk to you or your loves ones. In a private setting, a locked display case is just fine...But in a situation where you are selling your home, complete strangers will have the ability to see that you are a gun owner, how many guns you have, and the precise location of your collection. Considering the value of a gun collection can run into the thousands, they should be treated just like any other valuable in your home; locked away and out of sight. 3. Personal mail - Things like bill invoices, credit card statements, and social security information should be put out of sight. Identity theft is on the rise, and by taking the proper precautions, you can avoid your personal information from falling into the wrong hands. 4. - Prescription medication - Be sure to remove medications from your medicine cabinet that carry the potential for abuse. 5. Parental safety - If you are a parent, you'll obviously want to take precautions to keep your children safe. Remember...You are allowing complete strangers full access to your home. For peace of mind, consider removing family photos, personalized items such as prominently displayed school jerseys and embroidered pillows, and that A+ math test on the refrigerator. Many people feel this step is either unimportant or unnecessary. If you feel fine with displaying these items, then feel completely free to.  The odds of a person wanting to do your family harm are fairly low.  But if you are a "better safe than sorry" kind of person, then consider this step. As long as a few precautions are met, you have no reason to feel uneasy about your home being shown. The vast majority of the people who are going to be looking at your house are responsible members of society, looking for a home to either start or grow their own families. That being said....Better safe than sorry.