Posted by Peggy Farber on 3/25/2015

When you are buying a home the costs really add up and you may start thinking about where you can save money. One question that many buyers ask is do I need a home inspection? Most often the answer to the question is yes! A home inspection is an objective examination of the home and its systems. The inspection covers the entire house from the roof to the foundation. A home inspection will cover the home's foundation, basement, structural components, roof, attic, insulation, walls, ceilings, floors windows and doors. It will also examine the heating system, air conditioning, plumbing, and electrical systems. Because a home is often the largest single investment you will ever make it is important to know as much as you can about the home before you buy it. A home inspection will help you identify any needed repairs as well as what is needed to regularly maintain the home. The home inspection will help you proceed with the purchase with confidence. When choosing a home inspector cost shouldn't be your first consideration. Look for the inspector's qualifications, experience, training and compliance with state regulations. Remember, that no house is perfect. There are bound to be issues with almost any home use the information to decide if the house is right for you.

 
 
   





Posted by Peggy Farber on 12/3/2014

You may be considering buying a home but it is hard to know if you are ready to be a homeowner. It can be a big step. Buyers that educate themselves on the process and set realistic expectations have the best experiences. To gauge whether or not you are ready to own your first home you should ask yourself some serious questions.

  • Are you in a lease or is your living situation easily changed?
  • Do you need to remain in your current community or would you be willing to move?
  • Do you have the time and resources necessary to make your first home purchase a success?
If you have answered these questions favorably you may well be on your way to homeownership. The next step is to evaluate your financial situation. Here are some questions to check your financial readiness.
  • Do you have a steady source of income?
  • Do you know your credit history?
  • Do you have a down payment ?
  • Are you ready for the financial responsibilities that coincide with home ownership?
If your answers to these questions are positive then it is time to get the loan process started to see how much you can afford. A reputable lender will give you realistic expectations and many offer a free consultation for buyers seeking pre-approval. Now it is time to start your search. Working with an agent that you trust and are comfortable with is very important. My skills include educating you about the buying process, negotiating, having your best interest in mind and helping you find a perfect first home while hopefully saving you time and money.




Categories: Real estate  


Posted by Peggy Farber on 10/1/2014

When you walk into an open house and see the home you want to buy, before you start working with the seller's agent, you need to understand who that agent is working for. Many buyers do not understand that the seller's agent has a fiduciary duty or a duty of loyalty to the homeowner. While agency laws differ from state to state they have the same general principles: Typically an agent represents either the buyer or the seller. However, in some cases an agent will assume the role of a dual agent (representing both the seller and the buyer). Make sure to check the agency laws specific to your state, but in general agents fall into these categories: Seller's Agent: A seller's agent works for the real estate company that lists and markets the property for the seller, exclusively representing the interest of the seller. Buyer's Agent: Some states may have written agreements regarding buyer agency. A buyer agent assists the buyer in evaluating properties, preparing offers, and negotiating in the best interest of the buyer. Dual Agency: Dual agency occurs when the buyer's agent and the seller's agent are the same person or company (depending on state law). Dual agents do not act exclusively in the interests of either the seller or buyer. Dual agents cannot offer undivided loyalty to either party. A conflict of interest can arise because the interests of the seller and buyer may be different or adverse. A buyer and seller must agree to dual agency. Always ask your real estate agent about the agency laws in your state. Many states require buyers and sellers to sign a disclosure form at the first meeting between the agent and potential client.





Posted by Peggy Farber on 9/10/2014

It is a great time to be a real-estate investor. If you are looking to jump in the investor market low home prices and low interest rates make this a great time. According to Zillow.com. the real-estate market is starting to recover: U.S. houses lost $489 billion in value during the first 11 months of 2009, but that was significantly lower than the $3.6 trillion lost during 2008 and things only continue to look up. While the timing may be right, you will need to have all your ducks in a row. An investment purchase is different than your typical purchase. Consider your options. Have a strategy and know what kind of investor you would like to be. Ask yourself if you want to be a landlord, or are you planning on flipping or restoring and reselling properties. What types of properties are you interested in? There are many choices from land, to apartment buildings, residential housing and other commercial real estate. Partner with experience. Real estate agents experienced in investment property deals know what to look for in a deal. You may also want to consider asking a more experienced real-estate investor for advice. If you plan on becoming a landlord make sure to familiarize yourself with the local laws regarding being a landlord. Location, location, location. If you buy a property with hopes of renting it out, location is key. Homes in high-rent or highly populated areas are ideal; stay away from rural areas where there are fewer people and a small pool of potential renters. Also, look for homes with multiple bedrooms and bathrooms in neighborhoods that have a low crime rate. Also think about potential selling points for your property. If it's near public transportation, shopping malls or other amenities, it will attract renters, as well as potential buyers if you decide to sell later. The more you have to offer, the more likely you are to please potential renters. Have capital lined up. Speak to potential lenders or a financial planner about what you will need for assets and cash flow. You will need to have enough assets to handle the ups and downs that could come with investing. Most experts suggest a fallback of about six months of mortgage payments for landlords. You will need this in case or vacancy or repairs. If you're planning to fix up a home and sell it, you will need reserves to cover the costs to maintain the home while it is on the market. Becoming a real-estate investor is much different than being a residential homebuyer. A buying decision is a business decision not one based on emotions.