Posted by Peggy Farber on 1/20/2016

Finding a local mechanic after you move might feel like a full time job in addition to unpacking. No worries we have ideas. Most neighborhoods and communities need a mechanic at some time, even if just to blow up your bike tire. To narrow down your search for someone who can take a peek at your 2 door, 4 door, family truck, or traveling office, head to your local coffee shop. Not kidding! Get to know shop folks. What we mean is look around, figure out who the regulars are and ask them who their mechanic is. This networking adventure could be more useful than you think. Not only can you try out a few mechanics, but you will probably learn about other local hot spots. Everyone needs to know the best grocery store, gas station, bank, hair salon or barber, local restaurant and watering hole. You will be glad you took your time to search out the locals in your new community before you are in desperate need of a service, such as a mechanic. Once you are all settled in and can find your way around a little bit, explore and go get yourself a cup of coffee and say hi to the regulars for us.





Posted by Peggy Farber on 1/21/2015

If you happen to find yourself moving to another state in the near future, you've got your work cut out for you.  On top of having to deal with the stress of relocating your family in an unfamiliar place, you'll have a lot of paperwork and research to consider before the big day.  Here are four things that you'll need to have covered if you hope to have a seamless transition into a new residence.  Keep in mind that the more bases you've got covered, the easier it will be for you and your family to get accustomed to a new state. 1.  Cost of living. - The cost of living can vary dramatically from state to state.  If you're moving for a new job, then make sure to research the cost of living close to your new place of employment.  If you lived in a metropolitan area before, then it may serve you better to move to a town surrounding the city and pull a commute than to take a gamble at throwing yourself into a new city that may upset your current lifestyle.  Alternately, you may find that the state you are moving to has a fairly low cost of living in the metropolitan areas compared to what you are used to paying.  Every state is different in this regard.  Doing the research now will save you major headaches. 2.  Moving companies. - Unless you are packing up all of your belongings yourself, odds are that you will be relying on a long-distance moving company to handle most of the work.  Prices of this service can very dramatically from company to company, so be sure to get at least three quotes from reputable moving companies as to ensure you're getting the best deal.  Also, make room in your budget for an insurance plan that you are comfortable paying for.  The last thing you'll want to deal with during your move is the worry of your possessions being damaged with no recourse. 3.  Taxes. -  You may not think that taxes are an important thing to consider this early in the game, but if you live in a state that doesn't collect an income tax, moving to a state that does can impact your cost of living.  Meet with a tax specialist and review any hidden taxes and expenses you may incur as a result of your move so you aren't surprised later on down the road. 4.  Neighborhoods and local culture. - This may be one of the most important steps that a lot of people overlook.  Just because you do a virtual walk through of a home and like what you see, doesn't mean you'll like where you're moving.  Do some detective work before you sign papers.  Look into crime statistics, school ratings, reviews of the city and neighborhood you're considering moving to, and local taxes and ordinances.  You can find all of this information online relatively easy.  If you can manage it, then plan a visit to your potential new home to see everything your new town will have to offer.  Look at the commute to your new place of employment, the sights and sounds of the local culture, and keep an eye out for anything you don't particularly like about a place.  You can make your transition a lot smoother by connecting with a reputable real estate agent who has a healthy knowledge of the area.